Yoghurt and turmeric lamb meatballs

Yoghurt and turmeric lamb meatballs

I often contemplate today’s lifestyle bloggers-turned chefs and think what their CVs might look like. I think  on the page would there would be emboldened sentences like :

‘created vast demand for the spiralizer: an expensive and oppressive kitchen gadget that creates noodles from previously unappealing vegetables such as courgettes’

and

‘contributed heavily to a staggering increase of the price of cauliflower during 2015’

Because do you know that that’s what has happened? Avocados and cauliflowers have become a lot more expensive lately, and it’s partly down to skyrocketing demand generated by the current health food wave driven by these wellness warriors. And that’s cauliflower guys, a vegetable previously associated only with cheese and farting; not glamorous glowing beings writing to you from their yoga mats.

I’m being cynical – however many of these glowing beings have provided a huge amount of grain free and low-lactose inspiration, which is hugely helpful to anyone on a low FODMAP diet. So it’s down to them, and indeed a real sign of the times, that I bring you cauliflower rice in my latest recipe.

We can all poke fun at it, but cauliflower rice is actually really good. You pulse up half a cauli and fry it – it takes less that five minutes and it does provide a lighter and more fresh carb alternative when you just don’t feel like rice. Cauliflower however is high in the polyol mannitol, so watch out for that. If you know you malabsorb mannitol or you’re still in the elimination phase, swap this out with the regular rice of your choice.

you will need:

For the cauliflower rice:
1/2 x head cauliflower
1/2 x lemon
garlic oil (for frying)

For the yoghurt and turmeric meatballs:
1 x packet of lamb meatballs (I used 12. You could also easily make yourself from lamb mince, but I was feeling lazy)
garlic oil / 1 x garlic clove (depending on your tolerance)
1/2 teaspoon x fennel seeds
1 x teaspoon turmeric
250ml x plain yoghurt (remember we are allowed 2 x tbsp in one serving, so this is ok)

method:

Mix turmeric powder, fennel seeds and yoghurt in a bowl. Add a dash of garlic oil, or one crushed garlic clove if you tolerate fructans. Add the meatballs to the mix, being careful not to crush them. Coat them in the mixture and leave in the fridge for about an hour.

While this is marinating you can make your cauliflower rice (or pop some regular on to boil). To make the cauli rice, just pulse it up in sections and add to a hot pan with some garlic oil. Add the zest of half a lemon, squeezing the juice in afterwards. Fry on a low heat for a few minutes until it has a fluffy texture. Empty the cauliflower out of the pan and into a bowl.

Add some more garlic oil to the frying pan, and remove your lamb from the fridge. I find it best to just fry these all up in one go and tuck into them throughout the week (if they last that long!)

Simply fry in the pan, turning gently as the coating hardens to form a sunshine-yellow crust on each side. A lot of liquid will enter the pan at first, just keep stirring this up and I really recommend eating any excess marinade as it cooks; it’s the tastiest treat and has a texture a bit like halloumi.

Once your meatballs have cooked to your liking, add to your rice and enjoy.

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Life after the FODMAP diet: Part 1

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After almost two years, I’ve come out the other side of the low FODMAP diet infinitely more aware and in touch with my body’s responses to food. Like you I’m sure, I’ve kept food diaries, scoured hundreds of product labels, read countless articles and opinions and learnt entirely new limits to live within since embracing a low FODMAP diet.

In reintroducing FODMAPs into my daily life, I’ve concluded a few things from this gruelling test. The main thing I’ve learnt, thank God, is which foods I tolerate well and which foods I really don’t. Frustratingly, it also seems that some foods might seem fine one day, and totally screw me over another day. In this respect the test hasn’t been all that conclusive.

confused gif

Most annoyingly, a plate full of delicious, high FODMAP foods in groups that I have found I tolerate through reintroductions, can result in a lot of pain. This is because FODMAPs always build up in your stomach; so it doesn’t matter that I can tolerate glucose, lactose and GOS. If I wolf down a big bowl of lentils followed by some delicious chopped mango and a load of yoghurt – I’ll probably suffer due to the combination.

So my approach is to begin eating as normally as possible again, incorporating the FODMAPs that I can eat into my diet, while being conscious of my overall intake. Alongside this, something I’m trying to do now that I’ve completed my reintroductions is embrace a more balanced, gut friendly diet. This means making a conscious effort to eat FODMAP containing foods that are known to aid digestion and heal the gut. This means eating garlic for instance, and it means eating probiotics.

So today I thought I’d share a recipe for easy homemade kimchi. For those who don’t know, kimchi is a Korean dish, made from fermented cabbage with chilli, garlic, ginger and spring onions. Since trying it for the first time, I’ve been keen to try making it. It’s dead easy and will last a really long time. A tasty addition to salads and rice bowls, this probiotic miracle is rich in A and C vitamins and boosts the immune system generally by healing your gut.

Easy Homemade Kimchi

you will need:

A sealable 1 litre jar (e.g. Kilner)
Some food safe gloves (optional)
1/2 head of white cabbage, cut into chunks (this recipe is only suitable for those who tolerate GOS)
handful of radishes, sliced
1/2 cup sea salt
2 x chillis
3 x cloves of garlic (leave out if you don’t tolerate)
1 thumb of ginger
4 x green parts of spring onions (add the whole thing if you tolerate)
2 x tbsp fish sauce

method:

Slice your cabbage roughly into large-ish chunks and your radishes into thin slices. Pop in a big mixing bowl. Add the salt and massage into the veggies for a few minutes (do this with gloves on if you like). Salting the cabbage starts the fermentation process.

Next, add just enough cold water to cover the veggies. Pop a plate over them and weigh down with something heavy e.g. a bag of beans. Leave for 1-2 hours.

Make the paste easily by whizzing up the spring onions, garlic, chilli and ginger in a food processor (you can also chop by hand if you like). I love the smell of these ingredients together! I genuinely don’t remember the last time I cooked with fresh garlic, so this part was really exciting. If you don’t tolerate the fructans in garlic, do not substitute with garlic oil here, but rather just leave out of the recipe.

Add the fish sauce to the paste. Drain the cabbage and radishes and return to the bowl. Add the sauce to the cabbage and radishes and mix well with your hands. I really advise wearing some gloves here if you can, or using spoons instead to be sure the smell doesn’t stick to you!

You can now transfer to your sealable jar! Pack in tightly, allowing 2cm of breathing room at the top. Seal the jar and leave at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, for 1 – 5 days. Once you start to see bubbles, the kimchi is ready and can be refrigerated.

It’s so easy, tastes totally delicious, and looks as though it might do us a lot of good! Fingers crossed… bring on the probiotics…

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Low FODMAP pecan pie

low fodmap pecan pie

Pecan pie is one of my all-time favourite puds. With a teeth-achingly sweet filling and dense, crunchy crust … one piece is never enough. That’s why this raw, natural version has made its way into my fridge lately. I guarantee it will satisfy your craving for something sweet in a more lasting way, without the crash. Stash a couple of squares in your lunchbox for the 4pm slump.

This recipe is adapted from Madeleine Shaw’s Pecan Pie Bites in her first book, Get The Glow. I really like Madeleine Shaw’s food philosophy. Her approach is a sensible, fuss-free one in a world of overly-health conscious superfood-worshippers. Her books are fab for anyone who has made it beyond the reintroduction stage of the low FODMAP diet, with countless nuggets of relevant advice. She writes with an acute awareness of digestion issues having suffered with IBS herself, and her recipes are nutritious and light without leaving you feeling deprived. If you have a few alternative stapes such as buckwheat flour and ground almonds, which, let’s face it, if you’ve been following the low FODMAP diet for any amount of time you probably have acquired, most of her recipes will be accessible to you. She’s just released her second book, Ready, Set, Glow – which arrived at my door yesterday, and I can’t wait to test out some more of her inspiring recipes.

Having been a fan of these raw ‘cheesecake’ style desserts for a little while, I couldn’t resist adapting her Pecan Pie Bites into a low FODMAP, mini cake version. Whether you bring the dish to a party in pie form or slice it into mini slabs to take to work – this pie is one to try. Swap out honey and dates for maple syrup (agave would work too) if you malabsorb fructose.

low fodmap pecan pie

you will need:

For the crust:
2 x tbsp maple syrup / agave syrup / golden syrup (or 150g x pitted dates if you don’t malabsorb fructose, soaked in a bowl of just-boiled water)
100g x pecans
50g x almonds
50g x desiccated coconut
5 x tbsp coconut oil
pinch of salt

For the filling:
250g x pecans
1 x tsp cinnamon
50ml x almond milk
2 x tbsp maple syrup (or honey, or 1 x tbsp of agave)

method:

If you don’t malabsorb fructose, you can use honey and dates in this recipe – making it more nutritious. Begin by soaking 300g of dates in just-boiled water, then taking half of your soaking dates and chopping roughly into small bits. Blitz these, plus 100g of pecans,  the almonds, the desiccated coconut, 1 tbsp of coconut oil and a pinch of salt together to form a crust. If you’re not using dates, simply substitute for maple, agave or golden syrup. You just need a sweet ingredient that binds the rest of the crust ingredients together.

Once you have a consistency that will hold when pressed, push into a round springform cake tin or shallow dish with your fingers. Pop in the freezer for five minutes to set.

To make the filling, blitz the remaining dates (or your chosen syrup) with the filling ingredients, reserving a few roughly chopped pecans. Pour over the crust and scatter the pecans over the top. Pop in the fridge to set, and then slice as you fancy or chop into squares for a tasty treat on the go.

low fodmap pecan pie